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Thread: Quick question about turn order and priority really quickly

  1. #1

    Quick question about turn order and priority really quickly

    So I'm going to call Player 1 and Player 2 Jose and Diana, respectively.

    Jose goes, being the active player. He clears/draws/rerolls, and then say fields a character, or buys a die. Does he then pass priority to Diana, the inactive player, who can respond making 1 global or whatever else she can do, or does Jose keep doing whatever he's going to do until he passes priority completely ending his part of the main phase during his turn as active player, letting Diana now make whatever globals and whatnot she wants to, before the attack phase starts?

    Then, when the attack phase starts, I think I know this much: Jose declares attackers, and immediately, before being able to use any globals/abilities unless otherwise specifically specified somehow that it can be used between declaring attackers/assigning blockers, Diana assigns blockers... right? At this point, I think that Jose then has priority to declare whatever other abilities/globals that he wants to (after, say, re-rolling for a 'Ro for instance), and then Diana can respond.

    Here's where I get murky (murkier, as I'm not sure how correct I am so far). After both players declare their stuff, since Jose is active player, from what I've been hearing, he would get to decide when everything resolves before letting the inactive player, Diana resolve?

    Also, would anybody be able to provide an example? I want to ask some questions with examples, but I need to figure this out better, first.

    Like... I'm trying to think of a situation in which both the attacking and defending player would use globals/abilities, and then have an advantage depending on who resolves it in what order.

    So both players declare blockers. Does it then go to the active player to use the global on Anger Issues, which would put them at a disadvantage, because then the defending, inactive player would know how to respond?

    I ask all of this because I know that there isn't a stack like in Magic, but I haven't been able to find something with all of this fully detailed.

    Or... let's say the active player attacks and then the defending player declares blockers - can the active player then start using Relentless, or does it have to be first?

    And let's so he wanted to use both Relentless and Anger Issues globals, and the defending player wanted to use Anger Issues and the Mr. Sinister global, how is the order of resolving, well... resolved?

    I hope somebody understands what I mean, lol :-/

  2. #2
    Main step: Jose does everything he wants to (from 1 to infinite actions). He passes to Diana. Diana can do one thing, then passes priority back to Jose. He decides if he wants to do anything (from 1 to infinite actions). He passes back to Diana. Repeat until Diana passes. Jose can either do something and repeat the cycle, or he can pass and the Main Step is now officially over.

    Jose then decides if he wants to assign any attackers. If he doesn't, the turn ends (no more Global window, since there was no Attack Step). End-of-turn effects resolve.

    Otherwise the Attack Step looks like this:
    1. Jose declares any/all attackers
    --1a. Resoves any "When attacking/when assigns to attack" effects, in Jose's choice of order

    2. Diana declares any/all blockers
    --2a. Resoves any "When blocking/when assigns to block" effects, in Jose's choice of order

    3. Same Global Window as in the Main Step, except Jose can only use Action Dice (if he has any remaining) and Global abilities (i.e. he can't buy or field any new characters). He does 1 to infinite actions, then passes priority to Diana, who can do a single action before passing priority back to Jose. Same loop until Diana passes and then Jose passes.

    4. Assign all damage and resolve all combat, mostly in Jose's choice of order (for any effects, though all damage is assigned simultaneously).

    5. End of turn.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by SlapsterMcFlash View Post
    Also, would anybody be able to provide an example? I want to ask some questions with examples, but I need to figure this out better, first.

    Like... I'm trying to think of a situation in which both the attacking and defending player would use globals/abilities, and then have an advantage depending on who resolves it in what order.
    Global ability to do 1 damage to a character. Global ability to give a character +1D. Obviously if the active player is trying to ping a character to death, the inactive player would want to raise their defense. Unfortunately if Jose has the energy to activate the damage Global enough times, he can kill the character before Diana would be able to use the defense-raising Global.

    So both players declare blockers. Does it then go to the active player to use the global on Anger Issues, which would put them at a disadvantage, because then the defending, inactive player would know how to respond?
    Global can't be used until after blockers are declared.

    Or... let's say the active player attacks and then the defending player declares blockers - can the active player then start using Relentless, or does it have to be first?

    And let's so he wanted to use both Relentless and Anger Issues globals, and the defending player wanted to use Anger Issues and the Mr. Sinister global, how is the order of resolving, well... resolved?
    Relentless Global (Target Character cannot block, for those following along at home) can only effectively be used in the Main Step. It won't do anything after blockers are declared.

    Anger Issues Global (Target Character gets +1A) can be used by Jose as many times as he wants/can afford. Each resolves. When he's done doing whatever he wants to do, he passes to Diana. She can do one thing, we'll say Mister Sinister Global (Each player chooses one of his characters to take 3 damage). It resolves, then priority goes back to Jose to do whatever he wants. When he's done, he passes back to Diana to do one thing (Anger Issues Global), then it goes back to Jose. Wash, rinse, repeat.

  4. #4

  5. #5
    @crambaza created this really good flowchart (found in the Gallery section):


  6. #6
    That flowchart has one thing wrong, I think, that could lead to confusion.

    If the active player plays abilities and then passes back, if the active player does not want to do anything more, then the phase ends. The first diamond is superfluous and adds something that doesn't exist - you're not forced to go back if the inactive player did something. All that has to happen is that the inactive player passes, and then the active player passes, in that order.

    -----

    Active: I field and buy all this stuff. Pass.

    Inactive Player: I PXG 5 million times. Pass.

    Active Player: Pass. The phase is over. I now decide whether or not I will attack.

  7. #7
    This was true before the recent ruling that the active player has to ask to interrupt if they want to do something else. Strictly according to the rulebook, the active player gets priority back after the inactive player does one action. They don't have to use it, but after each and every action that the inactive player takes, the active player is allowed to "counter" (if they want to).

  8. #8
    I think we're talking Semantics here Dave, and I think this flow chart actually emphasizes a subtlety of the DM priority system that is often overlooked: Anytime the active player has an opportunity to do something he can do infinite somethings without interruption, while any time the inactive player does something he has to give the active player the opportunity to do infinite somethings again before he can do another something.

    The way you describe it:
    Inactive Player: I PXG 5 million times. Pass.
    is probably just as confusing because it alludes that the inactive player may PXG as many times as he wants without getting interrupted, but we know that is not the case. We could get into an argument about batch buying globals and how does that work, but the point here is, the way the flow chart reads emphasizes the fact that the active player can "go first" if players want to do something at the same time.

    A more subtle nuance of the point you're arguing is that I'm encouraging the inactive player to ask permission before doing each step he plans to take, where the strategy you are suggesting is that the inactive player declares the list of things he wants to do and you just tell him when you want to interrupt him. The difference is that by taking things slow, doing one step at a time and asking if his opponent wishes to interrupt, he's not giving any unnecessary information away to his opponent. Essentially what I'm delineating is an etiquette for being the inactive player that helps you keep your "cards" close to the vest, but legally give your opponent every opportunity to interact with you.

    1) Active player takes as many actions as he would like then passes.
    2) Inactive player takes 1 action and asks if the active player would like to take actions before the inactive player takes another. If the active player wishes to take actions, return to step 1.
    3) Inactive player repeats step 2 until he passes.
    4) Active may return to step 1 or pass to end the step.

    This is basically the other flow chart, but broken into active and inactive perspectives a bit more.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave View Post
    That flowchart has one thing wrong, I think, that could lead to confusion.

    If the active player plays abilities and then passes back, if the active player does not want to do anything more, then the phase ends. The first diamond is superfluous and adds something that doesn't exist - you're not forced to go back if the inactive player did something. All that has to happen is that the inactive player passes, and then the active player passes, in that order.

    -----

    Active: I field and buy all this stuff. Pass.

    Inactive Player: I PXG 5 million times. Pass.

    Active Player: Pass. The phase is over. I now decide whether or not I will attack.
    Incorrect.

    Both players must always get the chance to do everything they wish.

    The phase ends when both players pass without taking an action.

    So it has to be:

    AP: does stuff.
    AP: "Pass priority".
    IP: does stuff.
    IP: "Pass back".
    AP: "Pass priority".
    IP: "Pass back".
    Phase ends.

  10. #10

  11. #11
    I thought both players had to pass a turn consecutively, inactive then active.

  12. #12
    From DC rule book:
    In tournament play, the active player takes as many sequential actions as desired (from zero to all possible actions) before pausing and indicating that the inactive player can take an action. The inactive player can then either perform an action or decline the opportunity. Then the active player can take more actions.
    If the inactive player passes, and then the active player passes, no more actions can be taken that step (except for reactions to damage, as usual).

  13. #13
    From the rules forum:
    Every time the active player completes a series of actions, they must pass priority to the inactive player before they can move to the next step.

    One Scenario:
    Player A is the active player.
    Player A purchases a die and fields a character.
    *They pass priority to Player B.
    Player B uses a Global Ability.
    Player A takes any of the actions they are allowed to during their Main Step.
    Player A returns to the stage with the *.
    This repeats until a player passes instead of taking actions.

    If Player B passes instead, Player A can resume taking actions, and even pausing to give Player B the opportunity for Global Abilities.

    It is when Player A passes, Player B passes, and then Player A passes again that (barring any exceptions) players proceed to the next step (in this case, the Attack Step).
    See: http://wizkidseventsystem.com/bb/vie...&t=1610&p=8789

  14. #14
    I think there may be some confusion caused by the two meanings of 'to pass' that are in use here.

    In some instances it means 'to give' in others it means 'to do nothing'.

    The way I interpret the last paragraph of the quote from the rules forum, for example, is:

    "It is when Player A [does nothing], Player B [does nothing], and then Player A [does nothing] again that (barring any exceptions) players proceed to the next step (in this case, the Attack Step)."
    Last edited by Scorpion0x17; 05-29-2015 at 11:58 PM.

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