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Thread: Complete Understanding of the Main Step

  1. #1

    Complete Understanding of the Main Step

    I am wanting to ensure that I completely understand the Main Step, however obvious that might seem. I have read the rules and rather then quoting them here I will just use my own words.

    It is my understanding that the active player can buy dice, field characters, use globals and use action dice. This can be done in any order. The opposing player also has the ability to use globals during the active players main step. With this understanding, is the following play legal or is there a misstep in either rules or etiquette.

    1) I have rolled 4 energy, 1 Polymorph action die (on the action side) and 1 character which costs me one 1 energy to field.
    2) I field that character using 1 energy (leaving me with 3).
    3) I pass the ability to act to my opponent where they use two masks to PXG (Professor X Global) twice. They pass ability to act back.
    4) I buy a 3 cost character.
    5) I use the Polymorph action to switch the previously fielded character to the one I just purchased.
    6) I am then required to pass the ability to act back to my opponent, whom can't perform any further actions. They pass back.
    7) I end the Main Step and move to attack.

    The questionable part for me is what is legal or acceptable after I have initially passed the ability to act to my opponent?
    Last edited by fun4willis; 04-17-2015 at 01:40 PM.

  2. #2
    At a quick glance, looks right to me. I'll look more in-depth off mobile.

  3. #3
    Is #3 absolutely necessary? I've never passed priority before buying dice.

  4. #4
    The opposing player also has the ability to use globals during the active players main step.
    Globals AND action dice. You can't use action dice during your opponents attack step, but you CAN use them during your opponent's main step.

    Quote Originally Posted by RJRETRO View Post
    Is #3 absolutely necessary? I've never passed priority before buying dice.
    Step 3 isn't exactly necessary. You do have to perform step 6, where you pass priority to them until they can't or don't choose to take any more actions, and they you choose not to take any actions either. In this example I believe hat step three was there to illustrate the point that even if you pass to your opponent, they take actions, and then choose not to take any more, you can still perform actions after.

    In all, this example is pretty solid, and other than the clarification I made above, you got it all right.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by fun4willis View Post
    The questionable part for me is what is legal or acceptable after I have initially passed the ability to act to my opponent?
    So, you just passed your opponent priority, they decide whether to take an action or not. If they take an action, it resolves and then... technically... they have to give you priority to act again before they do anything else. But, realistically, if you had an action you wanted to do immediately after they perform an action, it would be best if you interrupted them, as usually they are free to do multiple actions after receiving priority.

    Think of it this way, it's your turn, you are king. If they want to do anything during your turn, they have to ask permission. If they want to do multiple things, they have to ask for each one individually, and if you feel like interrupting them, you're still king and they have to step aside for you to pass.
    With that in mind though, remember, all actions FULLY resolve before any other actions can be started(besides prevention and redirection abilities).

  6. #6
    @Shadowmeld - I was not aware that you could use an action die on your opponents turn at all. I thought if you choose not to use an action die (rolled to the action side) on your turn (main step or attack) it was moved to the used pile. That could be super useful.

    @RJRETRO - The idea behind passing the ability to act before completing all my own actions was more of an exercise of what I can do vs what I maybe should do. That said, in some cases it seems like it could be beneficial to have your opponent expend their remaining energy from the reserve pool before I complete my actions.


    I tend to think players assume the main step is complete when the ability to act is passed back and forth. Since this is not an indicator does anyone actually announce "main step complete" or is it just assumed when you move a character to the attack zone or pass turn? I speak more to tournament play then casual.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by fun4willis View Post
    @Shadowmeld - I was not aware that you could use an action die on your opponents turn at all. I thought if you choose not to use an action die (rolled to the action side) on your turn (main step or attack) it was moved to the used pile. That could be super useful.
    Most action dice go away; some, like the Millenium Puzzle or Vibranium Shield, stay.

    @RJRETRO - The idea behind passing the ability to act before completing all my own actions was more of an exercise of what I can do vs what I maybe should do. That said, in some cases it seems like it could be beneficial to have your opponent expend their remaining energy from the reserve pool before I complete my actions.
    Agreed, and sometimes this works in your favor. You have to give them priority again, but sometimes if you can't decide what to do, see what your opponent does. That could help you. Several times when playing I think about what I need to do in the attack step, and whether or not I should attack, and I realized that passing and seeing what my opponent does can help me make that choice.

    I tend to think players assume the main step is complete when the ability to act is passed back and forth. Since this is not an indicator does anyone actually announce "main step complete" or is it just assumed when you move a character to the attack zone or pass turn? I speak more to tournament play then casual.
    At that final step, I give my opponent a chance to act, they do/don't and go "I'm done." If I'm done too, I say so and then either declare an attack or say "I'm not attacking." Once they pass and you pass in that order there's nothing more to be done and it's time to decide if you'll attack.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave View Post
    Most action dice go away; some, like the Millenium Puzzle or Vibranium Shield, stay.
    Characters go away at the end of the Main step, action dice (so I just learned from the DC rules) go away at the Clean up step and energy goes away on your NEXT turn's Clear and Draw Step.

    Just clarifying, and reiterating that you won't have action dice in your reserve pool during your opponent's main step.

    I think I missed this rule because there is mention of using "actions" during your opponent's Main step, but they have since cleaned up that section of the rules.

  9. #9
    ah yes I see the question now. True, actions don't leave reserve until the end of your turn rather than at the end of main. Some actions get fielded and stay there until used a certain way.

  10. #10

  11. #11
    No, on your turn you have to pass twice in a row to cause your turn to end. You can pass, they can pass, and you can then choose to end your turn or not.

  12. #12

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Gaoler View Post
    Some clarification please about active player passing twice.

    Is it
    1. First pass to opp. Opp passes which ends the main step Forcing into attack. Second pass ends attack step and turn.
    or
    2. First pass to opp. Opp passes. 2nd pass from active ends the main phase and starts the attack phase?

    Sorry for being awkward but i like to make sure im doing things right.
    #2. But after the opponent passes, if the active player uses global, then it starts all over again. Essentially once the opposing player is done, and gives priority back to the active player, the active player decides if they are done with the main step or not.

  14. #14

  15. #15
    Agreed. Thanks everyone for the clarification.

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